"Anthropology: the most humanistic of the sciences and the most scientific of the humanities."
American Anthropological Association
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Welcome to This is Anthropology. On this website, you can learn more about the discipline of anthropology, use our interactive map to learn about anthropology projects in different parts of the world, explore the skills and careers anthropologists have, and find out how you can become an anthropologist.

About Anthropology Are You an Anthropologist? What do Anthropologists Do?
Learn more about anthropology and its four fields. About Anthropology.
Featured Biographies
Scott Ingram

Scott Ingram

I use the archaeological record to better understand contemporary problems such as human vulnerability to climate change and the sustainability of social and environmental systems. The past contains completed “experiments” in sustainability, resilience, and collapse that we can learn from.

Tommaso Gianni

Tommaso Gianni

I have an interest in the sinological and anthropological aspects of martial arts. I am currently conducting ethnographic field-work in South Korea regarding the pedagogy of a given Kungfu lineage: The case of Leung Ting WingTsun taught in Western Europe and East Asia. gianni@suwon.ac.kr

Elisa (EJ) Sobo

Elisa (EJ) Sobo

EJ Sobo specializes in health, illness, and medicine across cultures. She has worked in both academia and healthcare proper. Dr. Sobo's current core project examines how adults' ethnomedical understandings about healthy child development affect strategies and standards for K-12 education.

Erin B. Taylor

Erin B. Taylor

I am a cultural anthropologist at the University of Lisbon in Portugal. I research relationships between squatters and their material possessions in the Dominican Republic, mobile money in Haiti, and migration and trade across Hispaniola. I am also an Editor at PopAnth: Hot Buttered Humanity.

Jonathan Marks

Jonathan Marks

I am a biological anthropologist with eclectic interests, centered on the questions of “Who are we?” and Where did we come from?” My books include What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee (2002) and Why I Am Not a Scientist (2009). Paradoxically, however, I am about 98% scientist, and not a chimpanzee.

Nerissa Russell

Nerissa Russell

As a zooarchaeologist: I study animal bones from archaeological sites to understand human behavior. I work primarily at early farming (Neolithic) sites in eastern Europe and the Near East. I am interested in all aspects of human-animal relations, especially social and symbolic uses of animals.

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