"Anthropology: the most humanistic of the sciences and the most scientific of the humanities."
American Anthropological Association
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Welcome to This is Anthropology. On this website, you can learn more about the discipline of anthropology, use our interactive map to learn about anthropology projects in different parts of the world, explore the skills and careers anthropologists have, and find out how you can become an anthropologist.

About Anthropology Are You an Anthropologist? What do Anthropologists Do?
Learn more about anthropology and its four fields. About Anthropology.
Featured Biographies
Anna Osterholtz

Anna Osterholtz

I am interested in the health consequences of interaction between groups. Currently, I am doing dissertation work on the island of Cyprus regarding trade interactions; previously I have focused on the social role of violence in the southwestern US during the PI period (AD 700-900).

Elizabeth DiGangi

Elizabeth DiGangi

I am a biological anthropologist who studies the biology of the skeletal system. My work is two-fold: one focus is on the health of prehistoric populations, and a second focus is on forensic anthropology. I have worked with skeletal collections in Chile, Peru, Colombia, and North America.

Nerissa Russell

Nerissa Russell

As a zooarchaeologist: I study animal bones from archaeological sites to understand human behavior. I work primarily at early farming (Neolithic) sites in eastern Europe and the Near East. I am interested in all aspects of human-animal relations, especially social and symbolic uses of animals.

Lesley Gregoricka

Lesley Gregoricka

I am a bioarchaeologist, which means that I not only study ancient human skeletal material, but I also excavate tombs to learn about the context in which individuals lived and died in the past. I work in the Near East/Arabia, and am passionate about using bone chemistry to give a voice to the dead.

Anna Osterholtz

Anna Osterholtz

I am a bioarchaeologist focused on the heath consequences of interactions between groups. Whether it be the impact of trade on different groups or the social role of violence, bioarchaeology has the unique potential to uncover patterns in how people interact with each other.

Lamont Lindstrom

Lamont Lindstrom

Kendall Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa, Lamont Lindstrom has enjoyed the hospitality of Vanuatu since 1978, particularly of friends on the island of Tanna where he has learned and written about kava, traditional knowledge systems, ww2 ethnohistory, leadership, Nafe language etc

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